Tag

young adults

16, Sophomore, All-In

By | ePatient, Musician, Podcasts | One Comment

Welcome to the Health Hats podcast series about young adults transitioning from pediatric to adult medical care. In this series, I interview young adults with complex medical conditions, their parent or guardians, point-of-care clinicians caring for these young adults, and whoever else I find of interest in this fascinating, frustrating, heart-breaking, and inspiring world.

This second podcast of the series is with Sara Lorraine Snyder, a fine, eloquent, young woman who has lived her entire life with chronic medical issues. She’s learning to drive her own healthcare and manage the transition to adult medical care.

“If you were playing with the team for football or whatever and then they come you come in the next practice and half of your team is completely new people that you don’t even know and  then you don’t know how to effectively work with that team so that in the end of the day you can win or like achieve, whatever you need to.” Sara Lorraine Snyder

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Three Young Adults. 22 Years.

By | Advocate, Caregiver, Podcasts, Uncategorized | No Comments

Interview with Jill Woodworth, mother of 4, three with Tuberous Sclerosis, managing the transition from pediatric to adult medical care. Fascinating, frustrating, heart-breaking, and inspiring. Silos and boundaries,  crossing the threshold, primary physician,  autonomy, self-management. One of the scenarios with the most boundaries, cracks, and thresholds is where young adults with complex medical conditions transition from pediatric to adult care. “If there’s any communication, that has to go through me. Unfortunately, I have to network that system and that’s just really cumbersome.” “I can also help other people that have questions about how to transition. I’m certainly not an expert. But boy, it is something that I wish I always say do it the earlier the better. The earlier you can think about it the better.” “He’s learning. Like I taught him to get his own meds, you know, it’s kind of meeting each one of them where they are and what they can do. But it’s hard.” Read More

EHR Access for the Family Caregiver

By | Advocate, Caregiver, Consumer, ePatient, Informaticist | One Comment

We’re looking at technology that can help the primary caregiver support someone’s health journey. Access to the electronic health record (EHR) impacts seven of the fifteen needs described in a previous post:

    1. Common goals for the health journey developed with the person at the center, known by the entire health team
    2. Plans to attain those goals
    3. Current medications, schedule of taking, how they affect the taker
    4. History of medications, what worked and what didn’t
    5. Members of the health team, professional and lay people, how to reach them and the ability to reach them
    6. Schedule of events past and future – procedures, hospitalizations, diagnoses, appointments
    7. The same information in the hands of the entire team including the people at the center that they can understand

How can family caregivers access electronic health information of the person they support? Today, I’m with my 87-year old mother. I had her show me the portal she uses at the system where she gets most of her medical care. She wants me to have access to her medical record and wants me to be able to communicate with her doctors as she does. However, the site clearly says that unless the patient is a child under 11 years old that she can’t give me my own access to her account for technical and privacy reasons. So she gave me her login and password. This lack of direct access for primary caregivers is the norm. It’s NOT a privacy issue if the person give permission. It’s a technical issue that has long been solved by Children’s Hospitals trying to give access, some full access, some limited access, to parents and guardians of teens and children with blended and disputing parents. Rather it’s a matter of will and priorities. Some independent electronic health records, such as Practice Fusion, have mechanisms for primary caregivers to be granted access with permission. Also those health systems involved in the OpenNotes initiative – Beth Israel in Boston, Geisinger, Harborview in Seattle, are exploring giving primary caregivers access to physicians’ progress notes. Gives your data!!!

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