Tunza

By

Tunza

Resource Type: App

Thumbnail:

Tunza is a software platform making it easy for friends to help caregivers in meaningful ways during moments of crisis. From meals and transportation to emotional support.

Thoughts:

Tunza streamlines the process associated with organizing a network of supporters and managing everyday tasks. Friends can make task-based microdonation purchases from our network of service providers and online merchants.

Links:

http://tunza.net/

Carium

By

Carium

Resource Type: App

Thumbnail:

Carium guides users to better health by getting to know them and their goals and leveraging behavioral medicine expertise to provide personalized guidance, support, and resources. Carium enables stronger connections with family and caregivers so they can be involved and stay informed as a patient’s proxy, and with doctors, fitness coaches, and others who contribute to a users’ health so they’re on the same page and easy to reach.

Thoughts:

Carium gains a comprehensive view of each user — through clinical EMR data, patient-generated data from wearables, the environment, and questions offered at contextually relevant moments — and provides personalized, timely notifications and actionable insights. Carium also facilitates asynchronous care delivery through voice, text, photos, and video.

Links:

https://www.carium.com/

The Difference Collaborative

By

The Difference Collaborative

Resource Type: Presentation

Thumbnail:

Understanding the experience of Nurse family caregivers from a mission-driven, multidisciplinary team that helps employers understand and improve the experience of employees who serve as family caregivers and their colleagues.

Thoughts:

Our esteemed colleagues Geri Lynn Baumblatt, George Karavattuveetil, Caol Zindler, Olga Masevich, Pete Wendel, and Alan Arriaga

Links:

https://www.health-hats.com/difference-collaborative-caregivers-and-the-workplace-v2/

Healthy Humor

By

Healthy Humor

Resource Type: Website

Thumbnail:

We are an arts organization whose professional performers create moments of joy, wonder, laughter and comfort for hospitalized children and all others who are most in need.

Thoughts:

Entertainers in the hospital. Good stuff

Links:

https://www.healthyhumorinc.org/

https://twitter.com/healthyhumorinc

https://www.linkedin.com/company/healthy-humor-inc./

https://www.facebook.com/healthyhumorinc/

https://www.instagram.com/healthyhumorinc/

Engaging Family Caregivers as Partners in Care Transitions

By

Engaging Family Caregivers as Partners in Care Transitions

Resource Type: Article

Thumbnail:

A United Hospital Fund Special Report by Carol Levine and others. The goal: to take on the challenge of examining how chronically ill patients are transitioned
from one care setting to the next, and how that transition could be improved by systematically involving family caregivers and arming them with better information, training, and support. Specific strategies to achieve that goal were:
• Inclusion of the family caregiver in medication reconciliation;
• Identification of post-discharge patient needs and discussion of patient discharge options with the
family caregiver;
• Discharge preparedness (training, expectations of the day of discharge);
• A well-orchestrated day of discharge;
• Closing the loop, including post-discharge communication with the family caregiver and the
receiving agency

Thoughts:

A book published in 2013. Pretty good

Links:

https://uhfnyc.org/publications/880905

Atlas CareMaps

By

Atlas CareMaps

Resource Type: Tools

Thumbnail:

Caregiving happens within an ecosystem. Caregivers and the ones they care for are situated in systems of support, connected to others through networks and webs of relationships, shared experiences, and interactions.

At Atlas of Caregiving, we believe that in order to improve systems, we must first understand them. In this spirit, we’ve made it our mission to create practical tools that build on our understanding of the experiences of family caregivers while helping families and professionals better understand, and ultimately improve, their own lives. The first of these tools is the CareMap.

On this site, we have provided in detail  all the instructions and support you will need to draw your own CareMap.
On the Draw Your Own CareMap page, you will find a video that walks you through using the CareMap tool. You will also see Key Features and Tips.
On the Hand-Drawn CareMaps page, we have provided you video and instructions on how to draw a hand-drawn CareMap.
All CareMap instructions are available in Spanish, too. For the hand-drawn instructions, click here.

Thoughts:

Nice

Links:

https://atlasofcaregiving.com/practical-solutions/atlas-caremaps/

Words Matter When Talking About Pain With Your Doctor

By

Words Matter When Talking About Pain With Your Doctor

Resource Type: Article

Thumbnail:

If you’re in the hospital or a doctor’s office with a painful problem, you’ll likely be asked to rate your pain on a scale of 0 to 10 – with 0 meaning no pain at all and 10 indicating the worst pain you can imagine. But many doctors and nurses say this rating system isn’t working and they’re trying a new approach.

The numeric pain scale may just be too simplistic, says Dr. John Markman, director of the Translational Pain Research Program at the University of Rochester School of Medicine and Dentistry. It can lead doctors to “treat by numbers,” he says and as a result, patients may not be getting the most effective treatment for their pain.

Thoughts:

Hate that pain scale vital sign. Meaningless

Links:

https://www.npr.org/sections/health-shots/2018/07/23/626202281/words-matter-when-talking-about-pain-with-your-doctor

Stanford researchers: The secret to overcoming the opioid crisis may lie partly in the mind

By

Stanford researchers: The secret to overcoming the opioid crisis may lie partly in the mind

Resource Type: Article

Thumbnail:

Most people – including most physicians — think of pain as a physical symptom, but science reveals that emotions also play a big role. In other words – psychology is integral to the pain experience, and it can make it better or worse.

When pain is treated solely with medications, only part of the problem has been addressed. Meanwhile, patients may receive too little of another kind of pain care, one that teaches them self-management techniques for treating pain. Our scientific research in the growing area of pain psychology shows that pain relief is more effective when you address the body and the mind.

Thoughts:

Accessible article about the mind-body relationship of pain. Works for me.

Links:

https://www.washingtonpost.com/news/inspired-life/wp/2017/09/12/stanford-researchers-the-secret-to-overcoming-the-opioid-crisis-may-be-all-in-the-mind/?noredirect=on&utm_term=.7693c0f58fb7

EU Patient Empowerment Campaign

By

EU Patient Empowerment Campaign

Resource Type: Website

Thumbnail:

EPF officially launched a major one-year campaign on Patient Empowerment on 20-21 May 2015. We will work in concert with the health community to promote understanding of what patient empowerment means from the patient perspective among political decision-makers and health stakeholders.
“Patients with chronic conditions are often referred to as the most under-used resource in the health system while patient-centered care models have demonstrated better quality of care as well as potential long-term cost-efficiencies. Too many patients are still struggling to get the support they need to become equal partners in care. To make real progress, we need to make patient empowerment a priority, starting with the development of an EU-wide strategy and action plan”

Thoughts:

No need to reinvent the wheel. Especially nice graphic

Links:

http://www.eu-patient.eu/campaign/PatientsprescribE/

https://twitter.com/eupatientsforum

https://www.facebook.com/EuropeanPatientsForum

Caregiver Statistics: Demographics

By

Caregiver Statistics: Demographics

Resource Type: Article

Thumbnail:

65% of care recipients are female, with an average age of 69.4. The younger the care recipient, the more likely the recipient is to be male. 45% of recipients aged 18-45 are male, while 33% of recipients aged 50 or higher are male. [National Alliance for Caregiving and AARP. (2015). Caregiving in the U.S.]
Upwards of 75% of all caregivers are female, and may spend as much as 50% more time providing care than males. [Institute on Aging. (2016). Read How IOA Views Aging in America.]
Male caregivers are less likely to provide personal care, but 24% helped a loved one get dressed compared to 28% of female caregivers. 16% of male caregivers help with bathing versus 30% of females. 40% of male caregivers use paid assistance for a loved one’s personal care. About 14.5 million caregivers are males out of the 43.4% who care for an older family member. [National Alliance for Caregiving and AARP. (2009). Caregiving in the U.S.]

Thoughts:

Rich source of statistics

Links:

https://www.caregiver.org/caregiver-statistics-demographics