Category

Clinician

Professional, licensed caregiver, medical or not such as nurse, physician, technologist, therapist, etc.

Rest – another magic lever

By Clinician 2 Comments

I’m on vacation with my family on Cape Cod, playing, eating, napping, and swimming. For best health we need rejuvenation. All components of individual health: spiritual, mental, and physical, depend on rest and relaxation. These days most healthcare organizations exist in a constant state of change. Change is seldom restful. I suspect organizations need rest and rejuvenation for their best health. The front line bears the brunt with interrupted work flow and changes in staffing and technology. Those touching our patients, clients, consumers feel less worn when they can depend on a steady routine of care and service. One of the hardest jobs of leadership is to care for the front line so they don’t burn out. We can set realistic timelines, support flexibility in hours to promote work/life balance, and make sure that changes at least make some of the work easier. We can promote positive storytelling that links staff back to the mission – why they do the work they do. What a dilemma: ever shifting environmental challenges necessitates the constant change that exhausts staff.

How does your organization rest and rejuvenate?

Exercise – the instant magic lever

By ePatient, Clinician No Comments
Seems like a no brainer. Exercise, the instant magic lever for best health. Profoundly affects spiritual, mental, and physical health. One of the ways I discovered that I had multiple sclerosis was my inability to stay on a bicycle. I kept falling off when I stopped. Receiving the diagnosis was sobering at best! Sometimes very sad and depressing. Six months after my diagnosis I bought a Recumbent tricycle. I cried with relief that I could still get my favorite exercise. Can’t fall off a trike. Good for my soul, good for my heart, good for my quads. The direct connection between activity and recovery is so well documented.

How have we redesigned healthcare to include more activity? In that last 20 years patients walk right away after surgery and recover much more quickly. When I was an ICU manager we incorporated more activity into our standard operating procedure. We needed to use the families and caregivers to increase activity. We struggled with reluctant patients. But more activity for patients led to fewer complications, shorter stays, and better outcomes. Good for staff as well.  Have we taken this far enough? Do we build our organizational systems to maximize activity for staff?  I wonder if the magic levers of best health are obvious but fundamentally challenging-like the golden rule. Obvious and tough. 


What have you done to include physical activity in the routine of care giving?