Burning out professionals, oh my

Several readers commented about  the disruption of revolving door members of their professional  health team – those leaving a practice, with or without notice. One asked, why can’t organizations keep compassionate people-centered professionals? A good question. It takes time and effort as an e-patient to develop good relationships with professionals. When my clinicians have moved on, I am greatly stressed and my health is challenged. I was at a meeting recently of the Lown Institute, a predominantly physician group of burnt out or burning out docs committed to people-centered care. The main beef seemed to be with administrative burden / electronic record edging out face-to-face time between people and clinicians. Continue reading

Improving experience – decoupling a moving train?

I’m puzzled when people rate highly (very satisfied or satisfied) their experience in clinics and hospitals while still complaining about the experience. What is in the overall rating (would recommend)?  Is it a comparison with other experiences that weren’t as satisfactory, yet annoyances still occurred?  I have spoken with people and caregivers who say,

this experience was one of my best, but that’s not saying muchNone of them were very good. Or seeing the nurse practitioner was great, but it’s impossible to make an appointment that’s convenient to my life. One organization I’ve worked with asked people and caregivers what matter most to them in their experience. They said, we want to know when there are staff changes: they developed a good relationship with a clinician or a direct care staff person and that person leaves the practice. When a question about that was added to the questionnaire, the scores dropped.  Who knew they cared? Some organizations stop with high scores and don’t look further. It’s hard to keep up the routine of running the office or unit and still find time to listen in different ways (rounds, focus groups, referring concerns to someone with time to listen).  It’s also hard to have time as people and caregivers to find someone who will listen to your concerns. I have to get to work or school or I’m not really sure what’s bothering me about this experience but I’m unsettled.

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What’s the Problem with the Experience of People at the Center of Care?

Wearing my many hats: e-patient, caregiver, nurse, informaticist, and leader, I am blessed with mostly positive experiences on my health journey.  At worst, my experiences are seriously annoying. This week, attending a benefit for MITSS (Medically Induced Trauma Support Services), I’m reminded that not everyone is so lucky. As I scan the industry several problems with the experience of the people at the center of care (patients, caregivers, clinicians, direct care and support staff) jump out: Continue reading

I thank you God for this most amazing day

I thank you God for this most amazing day, for the leaping greenly spirits of trees, and for the blue dream of sky and for everything which is natural, which is infinite, which is yes.

e.e. cummings

An email this morning from the library told me that the reserved book, Wright Brothers by McCullough, had arrived. My big stressor was that yesterday I picked up another book, Quicksilver by Stephenson – all 925 pages. OMG, how can I get all that read in a week!!! Nice stressor, ehh? Also yesterday, my acupuncturist told me I hadn’t looked happier in  years. Wow:) Continue reading

Another threshold

My long-time friend, Glen, died last week. The first thing Glen and I  did together in Detroit, 1969 was to go into elevators and face the back to freak people out and then we got stoned. Glen helped my wife and I set the poles (trees) in the house  we built in West Virginia.  He and his wife had wanted us to move to Maine and live with them, but it was too cold for us. Glen died of brain cancer. His children took care of him for the last six weeks of his life in his home. Not a nurse among them. Continue reading